2006 Ferrari-Carano Trésor Reserve, Sonoma County, California

I decided to up the game with today’s wine and decanted the Ferrari-Carano Trésor for about an hour and a half before the rib got home from work.  The Trésor is a Bordeaux-style blend (79% Cabernet Sauvignon, 9% Malbec, 5% Merlot, 5% Petit Verdot, 2% Cabernet Franc) from Sonoma County, CA.

The first thing I noticed on the nose was plum.  There was also fig, tobacco, woodsmoke, and leather.  This wine hits the palate hard with big, bold fruit and heavy tannins.  The plum on the nose carried through to the palate and brought some dark cherry and spice along with it.  The Trésor really coats the mouth and has a big, lingering finish.  We took almost four hours with this bottle, and the longer it sat, the better it got.  Three or so hours into the bottle, the wine developed a soft woodiness and vanilla and raisin flavors emerged.  This is a well-integrated wine that didn’t disappoint and kept bringing more to the table over time.

That said, this wine is early in its drinking window (through 2016) and should cellar nicely for several years.  If I were to open another bottle soon, I would decant it for at least three to four hours; it’s 100% worth the wait.

We paired it with grilled steaks, which worked out fine, but to be honest, I would have preferred to get halfway through the bottle and light a cigar to enjoy with the rest of the bottle.  I found myself just wanting to sit with this wine—the food distracted me a bit.  The wine would have been quite enough on it’s own.

While the Trésor is a traditional Bordeaux-style blend, it’s not an old-world-style wine—it’s not even really new-world; it’s a unique wine that happens to be outstanding.  At $40+ to $60 per bottle, the Trésor really delivers.  (Note:  Ferrari-Carano lists it at $58 on their website, but this wine can be had for a little less).  I would recommend this wine to anyone that wanted a big, bold red.  I will definitely be getting a few more bottles so I can revisit this wine a couple of times in the years to come.

From the cork-pit,

Stub